What is glassfish server open source edition

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition is an open source application server built within the GlassFish community. Oracle GlassFish Server is based on GlassFish Server Open Source Edition. GlassFish Server users benefit from a vibrant community that offers self-support, contributes code and product features, product ideas and feedback, bug reports, and more. Useful community resources are outlined below.

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 6 is the industry standard for enterprise Java computing. Utilize the new, lightweight Java EE 6 Web Profile to create next-generation web applications, and the full power of the Java EE 6 platform for enterprise applications. Developers will benefit from productivity improvements with more annotations, more POJOs, simplified packaging, and less XML configuration.

  • Java EE Standard Descriptors. Java EE standard deployment descriptors are described in the Java EE 8 specification. You can find the specification at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/ . Information about the XML schemas that define Java EE standard deployment descriptors is available at http://xmlns.jcp.org/xml/ns/javaee/ . The Java EE 8 specification permits the use of alternate top-level standard deployment descriptors that reside outside of the application archive using the alt-dd mechanism (alternate module-level deployment descriptors were permitted prior to Java EE 7). Alternate deployment descriptors are described in the Java EE 7 specification. You can find the specification at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/ . Alternate deployment descriptors override the top-level deployment descriptors packaged in an application archive. For example, for EAR files, an alternate deployment descriptor overrides application.xml . For standalone modules, an alternate deployment descriptor overrides the top-level module descriptor, such as web.xml .

    GlassFish Server Descriptors. GlassFish Server provides optionaldeployment descriptors for configuring features that are specific toGlassFish Server. For example, when you assemble an EJB module, youannotate or create two GlassFish Server deployment descriptor files withthese names: ejb-jar.xml and glassfish-ejb-jar.xml. If the EJBcomponent is an entity bean with container-managed persistence (CMP),you can also create a .dbschema file and a sun-cmp-mapping.xml file.For complete descriptions of these files and their elements, seeGlassFish Server Deployment Descriptor Filesand Elements of the GlassFish ServerDeployment Descriptors.
    GlassFish Server also permits the use of alternate top-level GlassFishServer runtime deployment descriptors that reside outside of anapplication archive. Alternate GlassFish Server deployment descriptorsoverride the top-level deployment descriptors packaged in the archive.For example, for EAR files, an alternate GlassFish Server deploymentdescriptor overrides glassfish-application.xml. For standalonemodules, an alternate GlassFish Server deployment descriptor overridesthe top-level module descriptor, such as glassfish-web.xml. The nameof the GlassFish Server alternate deployment descriptor file must beginwith glassfish-. Alternate deployment descriptors do not apply tosun-*.xml deployment descriptors.
    Unless otherwise stated, settings in the GlassFish Server deploymentdescriptors override corresponding settings in the Java EE standarddescriptors and in the GlassFish Server configuration.

  • Oracle GlassFish Downloads

    Previous Releases

    Oracle GlassFish Server

    Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1.2.2

    Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1.2.2 Web Profile

    Java EE 6 Development Kit Bundles without JDK

    Java EE 6 SDK Update 4

    A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 applications.

    Includes:

    GlassFish Open Source Edition 3.1.2

    Java EE 6 Code Samples

    Java EE 6 API Documentation

    Java EE 6 Tutorial

    Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

    Java EE 6 Web Profile SDK Update 4

    A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 web applications.

    Includes:

    GlassFish Open Source Edition Web Profile 3.1.2

    Java EE 6 Code Samples

    Java EE 6 API Documentation

    Java EE 6 Tutorial

    Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

    Java EE 6 Development Kit Bundles with JDK

    Java EE 6 SDK Update 4 with JDK 7 Update 11

    A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 applications.

    Includes:

    JDK 7 Update 11

    GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

    Java EE 6 Code Samples

    Java EE 6 API Documentation

    Java EE 6 Tutorial

    Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

    Java EE 6 SDK Update 4 with JDK 6 Update 38

    A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 applications.

    Includes:

    JDK 6 Update 38

    GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

    Java EE 6 Code Samples

    Java EE 6 API Documentation

    Java EE 6 Tutorial

    Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

    Java EE 6 Web Profile SDK Update 4 with JDK 7 Update 11

    A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 web applications.

    Includes:

    JDK 7 Update 11

    GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

    Java EE 6 Code Samples

    Java EE 6 API Documentation

    Java EE 6 Tutorial

    Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

    Java EE 6 Web Profile SDK Update 4 with JDK 6 Update 38

    A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 web applications.

    Includes:

    JDK 6 Update 38

    GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

    Java EE 6 Code Samples

    Java EE 6 API Documentation

    Java EE 6 Tutorial

    Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

    Note: The technologies contained in the SDKs are based on Java Specification Requests (JSRs) listed on the Java EE 6 Standards page.

    Support: Develop and deploy efficiently with Oracle GlassFish Server with advanced monitoring features. Oracle offers flexible pricing to suit your needs.
    » Purchase.

    Component DownloadsGlassFish Loadbalancer Configurator 3.1.2.2DownloadYour First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE PlatformDownload (PDF)

    The Java EE Tutorial, Java EE 6 Samples, Java API Documentation, and Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform are available via Oracle GlassFish Server Update Center .

    Additional Resources

    Java EE 6 Documentation

    Java EE 6 JDK Source Code

    The Java EE 6 SDK is based on GlassFish Server Open Source Edition, and for those interested in exploring the details of the Java EE 6 Reference Implementation the source code is available. This includes schools, universities, companies, and individuals who want to examine the source code for personal interest or research & development.

    Java EE 6 Specifications

    The Java EE 6 Specifications contain all the technical specifications for Java EE 6 application developers and Jave EE 6 Server implementors.

    About

    GlassFish is the Open Source Java EE Reference Implementation; as such, we welcome external contributions. Make sure to read our Pull Request acceptance workflow.

    Latest News

    Ongoing

    Announcements and updates about Eclipse GlassFish and Jakarta EE are posted from time to time here

    Sept 10, 2019 – Jakarta EE 8 released

    See here.

    Jan 29, 2019 – Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 released

    See here.

    Jan 29, 2019 – Java EE 8u1 and GlassFish 5.0.1 released

    See here.

    Sept 28, 2017 – Introducing Eclipse Enterprise for Java

    See here.

    Sept 21, 2017 – Java EE 8 and GlassFish 5.0 Released!

    See the annoucement here.

    See here for an important update.

    Aug 11, 2017 – Java.Net Mailing Lists Archive

    The Java.Net Mailing Lists Archive can now be consulted here.

    Additional details on how to use GF 4.1.2 and GF 5 nightly Docker images.

    Application server project

    This article is about a software product. For the freshwater and marine fish, see Ambassidae

    GlassFish is an open-source Jakarta EE platform application server project started by Sun Microsystems, then sponsored by Oracle Corporation, and now living at the Eclipse Foundation and supported by Payara, Oracle and Red Hat.[2] The supported version under Oracle was called Oracle GlassFish Server. GlassFish is free software and was initially dual-licensed under two free software licences: the Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL) and the GNU General Public License (GPL) with the Classpath exception. After having been transferred to Eclipse, GlassFish remained dual-licensed, but the CDDL license was replaced by the Eclipse Public License (EPL).[3]

    Overview

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    GlassFish is the Eclipse implementation of Jakarta EE (formerly the reference implementation from Oracle) and as such supports EJB, JPA, JSF, JMS, RMI, JSP, servlets, etc. This allows developers to create enterprise applications that are portable and scalable, and that integrate with legacy technologies. Optional components can also be installed for additional services.

    Built on a modular kernel powered by OSGi, GlassFish runs straight on top of the Apache Felix implementation. It also runs with Equinox OSGi or Knopflerfish OSGi runtimes. HK2 abstracts the OSGi module system to provide components, which can also be viewed as services. Such services can be discovered and injected at runtime.

    GlassFish is based on source code released by Sun and Oracle Corporation’s TopLink persistence system. It uses a derivative of Apache Tomcat as the servlet container for serving web content, with an added component called Grizzly which uses Java non-blocking I/O (NIO) for scalability and speed.

    Releases

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    In October 2003, Sun Microsystems released Sun ONE Application Server 7 [4][5] that supports the J2EE 1.3 specification. It is based on the iPlanet Web Server and the J2EE reference implementation[6] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

    In March 2004, Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8[7] that supports the J2EE 1.4 specification. In June 2004 update 1 is released.[8] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

    On 8 February 2005, Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8.1 that supports the J2EE 1.4 specification. This version introduced a major update to web services security (a precursor to the later JASPIC and Jakarta Authentication), Admin Console GUI enhancements, JavaServer Faces 1.1 Support (at this point not yet part of J2EE), performance enhancements, and support for Java SE 5.0.[9] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

    Sun Microsystems launched the GlassFish project on 6 June 2005 by publishing the vetted source of Sun Java System Application Server.[10][11] Builds of this early version identity themselves in the log as “sun-appserver-pe9.0”.[12]

    On 31 January 2006, Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8.2.[13] This version introduced bundling of the Derby database and Fast Infoset for web services.[14] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

    On 4 May 2006, Project GlassFish released the 1.0 version (a.k.a. Sun Java System Application Server 9.0) that supports the Java EE 5 specification.

    On 15 May 2006 Sun Java System Application Server 9.0, derived from GlassFish 1.0, is released.[15]

    On 8 May 2007 Project SailFin was announced at JavaOne as a sub-project under Project GlassFish. Project SailFin aims to add Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) servlet functionality to GlassFish.[16]

    On 17 September 2007 the GlassFish community released version 2.0 (a.k.a. Sun Java System Application Server 9.1) with full enterprise clustering capabilities, Microsoft-interoperable Web Services.

    On 21 January 2009 Sun Microsystems and the community released version GlassFish 2.1 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 2.1) which serves as the basis for the Sailfin 1.0 (a.k.a. Sun Communication Application Server 1.0).

    SailFin 2.0 (a.k.a. Sun Communication Application Server 2.0) which was released on 28 October 2009 leverages GlassFish 2.1.1 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 2.1.1) and adds a number of features including high availability, rolling upgrade, flexible network topology, better overload protection, Diameter support, improved diagnosability, Java based DCR files for the load balancer, and more.

    On 10 December 2009 GlassFish 3.0 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 3.0) was released. Being the Java EE reference implementation, this was the first application server to completely implement Java EE 6 JSR 316. JSR 316 was however approved with reservations.[17] In this version GlassFish adds new features to ease migration from Tomcat to GlassFish.[18] The other main new features are around modularity (GlassFish v3 Prelude already shipped with an Apache Felix OSGi runtime), startup time (a few seconds), deploy-on-change (provided by NetBeans and Eclipse plugins), and session preservation across redeployments.[19]

    On 25 March 2010, soon after the acquisition of Sun Microsystems, Oracle issued a Roadmap for versions 3.0.1, 3.1, 3.2 and 4.0 with themes revolving around clustering, virtualization and integration with Coherence and other Oracle technologies. The open source community remains otherwise unaffected.

    On 28 February 2011, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1. This version introduced support for ssh-based provisioning, centralized admin, clustering and load-balancing. It maintains its support for both the Web Profile and full Java EE 6 Platform specifications.

    On 28 July 2011, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.1. This is fix release for GlassFish 3.1 with multiple component updates (Weld, Mojarra, Jersey, EclipseLink, …), JDK 7 support, AIX support and more.

    On 29 February 2012, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.2. This release includes bug fixes and new features including administration console enhancements, transaction recovery from a database and new thread pool properties.

    On 17 July 2012, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.2.2. This is a “micro” release to address some exceptional issues in the product.[20]

    On 12 June 2013, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.0. This major release brings Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 support.[21]

    On 9 September 2014, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1. This release includes many bug fixes (over a thousand) and the latest MR releases of CDI and WebSockets.[22]

    On 7 October 2015, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1.1. This release includes many bug fixes and security fixes as well as updates to many underlying components.[23]

    On 31 March 2017, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1.2. This release includes bug fixes.[24]

    On 21 September 2017, Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 5.0. This release includes Java EE 8 Open Source Reference Implementation and that the Java EE 8 umbrella specification and all the underlying specifications (JAX-RS 2.1, Servlet 4.0, CDI 2.0, JSON-B 1.0, Bean Validation 2.0, etc.) are finalized and approved.[25]

    On 29 January 2019, the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 5.1. This release is technically identical to Oracle’s GlassFish 5.0 but is fully build from the source code that Oracle transferred to the Eclipse Foundation and which was subsequently relicensed to EPL. Like GlassFish 5.0, 5.1 is Java EE 8 certified, but does not have any RI status. The main goal of this release is to prove that all source code has been transferred and can indeed be built into a fully compliant product.[26]

    On 31 December 2020, the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.0.0. This version is functionally largely identical to GlassFish 5.1 but implements Jakarta EE 9.[27] Jakarta EE 9 is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 8 (which is functionally identical to Java EE 8) but has its package and various constants changed from javax.* to jakarta.*

    On 5 May 2021, the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.1.0. This version is functionally identical to GlassFish 6.0.0 but implements Jakarta EE 9.1. Jakarta EE 9.1 is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 9 (which is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 8 and Java EE 8) but has support for JDK 11. In the months after, 6.2.0 containing Jakarta MVC and the JDK 17 compatible 6.2.1 containing Eclipse Exousia are released.

    Roadmap and end of Oracle commercial support

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    The commercially supported version of GlassFish was known as Oracle GlassFish Server,[28] formerly Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server, and previously Sun Java System Application Server (SJSAS) has a history, along with other iPlanet software, going back to Netscape Application Server. This includes code from other companies such as Oracle Corporation for TopLink Essentials. Ericsson’s SIP Servlet support is included, the opensource version of it is SailFish, developing towards JSR-289.[29] In 2010, the difference between the commercial and open source edition was already quite small.[29]

    On 4 November 2013, Oracle announced the future roadmap for Java EE and Glassfish Server, with a 4.1 open-source edition planned and continuing open-sources updates to GlassFish but with an end to commercial Oracle support.[30][31] Commercial customers have instead been encouraged to transition to Oracle’s alternative product, Oracle WebLogic Server.

    In response to Oracle’s announcement to end commercial support for GlassFish, a fork called Payara Server was created and released in October 2014. Payara Server is open source under the same licenses as GlassFish, but has optional commercial support.

    Open-source GlassFish continued under Oracle till version 5.0 (the reference implementation for Java EE 8) after which the source code was donated to the Eclipse Foundation,[32] which released the technically identical but relicensed version 5.1.[26] At Eclipse, Payara is leading the GlassFish project, with support from Oracle and Red Hat.[2]

    A GlassFish 5.2 release was planned as a Jakarta EE 8 compatible implementation, but was never released. Jakarta EE 8 is functionally identical to Java EE 8, but was created via the Eclipse Foundation Specification Process (EFSP).[33]

    See also

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    Other CDDL-licensed, Java-based services:

    Other Jakarta EE application servers:

    References

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    Written by Jane