What are the 3 different domains of representation in y chart

Y-CHART

FIG: Y-CHART TERMINOLOGY

The Y-Chart was a representation proposed by Gajski-Kuhn, in order to capture specification domains, abstraction levels and their inter-relation. The hierarchical levels within the design process are characterized by five concentric circles. The abstraction increases from the inner to the outer circle.

The 3 Domains:

Behavioral Domain: The temporal and functional behavior of a system is described in this level.

Structural Domain: Subsystems assembled together form a system. The different subsystems and their interconnection to each other is contemplated for each level of abstraction.

Physical Domain: The geometric properties of the system and its subsystems are described in this level. The size, shape and the physical placement are informed here.

Y-CHART_1

FIG: GAJSKI-KUHN Y-CHART

An Abstraction is a simplified model of some entity which hides certain amount of the internal details of this entity. Lower-level abstractions give more details of the modeled entity. Several levels of abstractions (details) that are commonly used are as shown below:

ABSTRACTION_LEVELS

Reference:

Gajski-Kuhn chart – Dr. Joachim Schlosser – https://www.schlosser.info/wp-content/uploads/diplomathesis/thesissu7.html.

 

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VLSI Design – Digital System

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Very-large-scale integration (VLSI) is the process of creating an integrated circuit (IC) by combining thousands of transistors into a single chip. VLSI began in the 1970s when complex semiconductor and communication technologies were being developed. The microprocessor is a VLSI device.

Before the introduction of VLSI technology, most ICs had a limited set of functions they could perform. An electronic circuit might consist of a CPU, ROM, RAM and other glue logic. VLSI lets IC designers add all of these into one chip.

The electronics industry has achieved a phenomenal growth over the last few decades, mainly due to the rapid advances in large scale integration technologies and system design applications. With the advent of very large scale integration (VLSI) designs, the number of applications of integrated circuits (ICs) in high-performance computing, controls, telecommunications, image and video processing, and consumer electronics has been rising at a very fast pace.

The current cutting-edge technologies such as high resolution and low bit-rate video and cellular communications provide the end-users a marvelous amount of applications, processing power and portability. This trend is expected to grow rapidly, with very important implications on VLSI design and systems design.

VLSI Design Flow

The VLSI IC circuits design flow is shown in the figure below. The various levels of design are numbered and the blocks show processes in the design flow.

Specifications comes first, they describe abstractly, the functionality, interface, and the architecture of the digital IC circuit to be designed.

VLSI Design Flow

Behavioral description is then created to analyze the design in terms of functionality, performance, compliance to given standards, and other specifications.

RTL description is done using HDLs. This RTL description is simulated to test functionality. From here onwards we need the help of EDA tools.

RTL description is then converted to a gate-level netlist using logic synthesis tools. A gatelevel netlist is a description of the circuit in terms of gates and connections between them, which are made in such a way that they meet the timing, power and area specifications.

Finally, a physical layout is made, which will be verified and then sent to fabrication.

Y Chart

The Gajski-Kuhn Y-chart is a model, which captures the considerations in designing semiconductor devices.

The three domains of the Gajski-Kuhn Y-chart are on radial axes. Each of the domains can be divided into levels of abstraction, using concentric rings.

At the top level (outer ring), we consider the architecture of the chip; at the lower levels (inner rings), we successively refine the design into finer detailed implementation −

Creating a structural description from a behavioral one is achieved through the processes of high-level synthesis or logical synthesis.

Creating a physical description from a structural one is achieved through layout synthesis.

Y-chart

Design Hierarchy-Structural

The design hierarchy involves the principle of “Divide and Conquer.” It is nothing but dividing the task into smaller tasks until it reaches to its simplest level. This process is most suitable because the last evolution of design has become so simple that its manufacturing becomes easier.

We can design the given task into the design flow process’s domain (Behavioral, Structural, and Geometrical). To understand this, let’s take an example of designing a 16-bit adder, as shown in the figure below.

Design Hierarchy-Structural

Here, the whole chip of 16 bit adder is divided into four modules of 4-bit adders. Further, dividing the 4-bit adder into 1-bit adder or half adder. 1 bit addition is the simplest designing process and its internal circuit is also easy to fabricate on the chip. Now, connecting all the last four adders, we can design a 4-bit adder and moving on, we can design a 16-bit adder.

4-bit adder

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A line chart that is rendered within the browser using SVG or VML.Displays tooltips when hovering over points.

You can smooth the lines by setting the curveType option to function:

The code to generate this chart is below. Note the use of the curveType: function option:

In 2014, Google announced guidelines intended to support a common look and feel across its properties and apps (such as Android apps) that run on Google platforms. We call this effort Material Design. We’ll be providing “Material” versions of all our core charts; you’re welcome to use them if you like how they look.

Creating a Material Line Chart is similar to creating what we’ll now call a “Classic” Line Chart. You load the Google Visualization API (although with the 'line' package instead of the 'corechart' package), define your datatable, and then create an object (but of class google.charts.Line instead of google.visualization.LineChart).

Note: Material Charts will not work in old versions of Internet Explorer. (IE8 and earlier versions don’t support SVG, which Material Charts require.)

Material Line Charts have many small improvements over Classic Line Charts, including an improved color palette, rounded corners, clearer label formatting, tighter default spacing between series, softer gridlines, and titles (and the addition of subtitles).

The Material Charts are in beta. The appearance and interactivity are largely final, but many of the options available in Classic Charts are not yet available in them. You can find a list of options that are not yet supported in this issue.

Also, the way options are declared is not finalized, so if you are using any of the classic options, you must convert them to material options by replacing this line:

chart.draw(data, options);

…with this:

chart.draw(data, google.charts.Line.convertOptions(options));

Sometimes you’ll want to display two series in a line chart, with two independent y-axes: a left axis for one series, and a right axis for another:

Note that not only are our two y-axes labeled differently (“Temps” versus “Daylight”) but they each have their own independent scales and gridlines. If you want to customize this behavior, use the vAxis.gridlines and vAxis.viewWindow options.

In the Material code below, the axes and series options together specify the dual-Y appearance of the chart. The series option specifies which axis to use for each ('Temps' and 'Daylight'; they needn’t have any relation to the column names in the datatable). The axes option then makes this chart a dual-Y chart, placing the 'Temps' axis on the left and the 'Daylight' axis on the right.

In the Classic code, this differs slightly. Rather than the axes option, you will use the vAxes option (or hAxes on horizontally oriented charts). Also, instead of using names, you will use the index numbers to coordinate a series with an axis using the targetAxisIndex option.

Note: Top-X axes are available only for Material charts (i.e., those with package line).

If you want to put the X-axis labels and title on the top of your chart rather than the bottom, you can do that in Material charts with the axes.x option:

The google.charts.load package name is "corechart", and the visualization’s class name is google.visualization.LineChart.

For Material Line Charts, the google.charts.load package name is "line", and the visualization’s class name is google.charts.Line.

Rows: Each row in the table represents a set of data points with the same x-axis location.

Columns:

Name aggregationTarget

How multiple data selections are rolled up into tooltips:

  • 'category': Group selected data by x-value.
  • 'series': Group selected data by series.
  • 'auto': Group selected data by x-value if all selections have the same x-value, and by series otherwise.
  • 'none': Show only one tooltip per selection.

aggregationTarget will often be used in tandem with selectionMode and tooltip.trigger, e.g.:

var options = { // Allow multiple // simultaneous selections. selectionMode: 'multiple', // Trigger tooltips // on selections. tooltip: {trigger: 'selection'}, // Group selections // by x-value. aggregationTarget: 'category',}; 

Type: string

Default: ‘auto’

animation.duration

The duration of the animation, in milliseconds. For details, see the animation documentation.

Type: number

Default: 0

animation.startup

Determines if the chart will animate on the initial draw. If true, the chart will start at the baseline and animate to its final state.

Type: boolean

Default false

animation.easing

The easing function applied to the animation. The following options are available:

  • ‘linear’ – Constant speed.
  • ‘in’ – Ease in – Start slow and speed up.
  • ‘out’ – Ease out – Start fast and slow down.
  • ‘inAndOut’ – Ease in and out – Start slow, speed up, then slow down.

Type: string

Default: ‘linear’

annotations.boxStyle

For charts that support annotations, the annotations.boxStyle object controls the appearance of the boxes surrounding annotations:

var options = { annotations: { boxStyle: { // Color of the box outline. stroke: '#888', // Thickness of the box outline. strokeWidth: 1, // x-radius of the corner curvature. rx: 10, // y-radius of the corner curvature. ry: 10, // Attributes for linear gradient fill. gradient: { // Start color for gradient. color1: '#fbf6a7', // Finish color for gradient. color2: '#33b679', // Where on the boundary to start and // end the color1/color2 gradient, // relative to the upper left corner // of the boundary. x1: '0%', y1: '0%', x2: '100%', y2: '100%', // If true, the boundary for x1, // y1, x2, and y2 is the box. If // false, it's the entire chart. useObjectBoundingBoxUnits: true } } }}; 

This option is currently supported for area, bar, column, combo, line, and scatter charts. It is not supported by the Annotation Chart.

Type: object

Default: null

annotations.datum annotations.datum object lets you override Google Charts’ choice for annotations provided for individual data elements (such as values displayed with each bar on a bar chart). You can control the color with annotations.datum.stem.color, the stem length with annotations.datum.stem.length, and the style with annotations.datum.style.

For charts that support annotations , theobject lets you override Google Charts’ choice for annotations provided for individual data elements (such as values displayed with each bar on a bar chart). You can control the color with, the stem length with, and the style with

Type: object

Default: color is “black”; length is 12; style is “point”.

annotations.domain annotations.domain object lets you override Google Charts’ choice for annotations provided for a domain (the major axis of the chart, such as the X axis on a typical line chart). You can control the color with annotations.domain.stem.color, the stem length with annotations.domain.stem.length, and the style with annotations.domain.style.

For charts that support annotations , theobject lets you override Google Charts’ choice for annotations provided for a domain (the major axis of the chart, such as the X axis on a typical line chart). You can control the color with, the stem length with, and the style with

Type: object

Default: color is “black”; length is 5; style is “point”.

annotations.highContrast annotations.highContrast boolean lets you override Google Charts’ choice of the annotation color. By default, annotations.highContrast is true, which causes Charts to select an annotation color with good contrast: light colors on dark backgrounds, and dark on light. If you set annotations.highContrast to false and don’t specify your own annotation color, Google Charts will use the default series color for the annotation:

For charts that support annotations , theboolean lets you override Google Charts’ choice of the annotation color. By default,is true, which causes Charts to select an annotation color with good contrast: light colors on dark backgrounds, and dark on light. If you setto false and don’t specify your own annotation color, Google Charts will use the default series color for the annotation:


Type: boolean

Default: true

annotations.stem annotations.stem object lets you override Google Charts’ choice for the stem style. You can control color with annotations.stem.color and the stem length with annotations.stem.length. Note that the stem length option has no effect on annotations with style 'line': for 'line' datum annotations, the stem length is always the same as the text, and for 'line' domain annotations, the stem extends across the entire chart.

For charts that support annotations , theobject lets you override Google Charts’ choice for the stem style. You can control color withand the stem length with. Note that the stem length option has no effect on annotations with style: fordatum annotations, the stem length is always the same as the text, and fordomain annotations, the stem extends across the entire chart.

Type: object

Default: color is “black”; length is 5 for domain annotations and 12 for datum annotations.

annotations.style annotations.style option lets you override Google Charts’ choice of the annotation type. It can be either 'line' or 'point'.

For charts that support annotations , theoption lets you override Google Charts’ choice of the annotation type. It can be eitheror

Type: string

Default: ‘point’

annotations.textStyle annotations.textStyle object controls the appearance of the text of the annotation:

For charts that support annotations , theobject controls the appearance of the text of the annotation:

var options = { annotations: { textStyle: { fontName: 'Times-Roman', fontSize: 18, bold: true, italic: true, // The color of the text. color: '#871b47', // The color of the text outline. auraColor: '#d799ae', // The transparency of the text. opacity: 0.8 } }}; 

This option is currently supported for area, bar, column, combo, line, and scatter charts. It is not supported by the Annotation Chart .

Type: object

Default: null

axisTitlesPosition

Where to place the axis titles, compared to the chart area. Supported values:

  • in – Draw the axis titles inside the chart area.
  • out – Draw the axis titles outside the chart area.
  • none – Omit the axis titles.

Type: string

Default: ‘out’

backgroundColor

The background color for the main area of the chart. Can be either a simple HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00', or an object with the following properties.

Type: string or object

Default: ‘white’

backgroundColor.stroke

The color of the chart border, as an HTML color string.

Type: string

Default: ‘#666’

backgroundColor.strokeWidth

The border width, in pixels.

Type: number

Default: 0

backgroundColor.fill

The chart fill color, as an HTML color string.

Type: string

Default: ‘white’

chartArea

An object with members to configure the placement and size of the chart area (where the chart itself is drawn, excluding axis and legends). Two formats are supported: a number, or a number followed by %. A simple number is a value in pixels; a number followed by % is a percentage. Example: chartArea:{left:20,top:0,width:'50%',height:'75%'}

Type: object

Default: null

chartArea.backgroundColor

Chart area background color. When a string is used, it can be either a hex string (e.g., ‘#fdc’) or an English color name. When an object is used, the following properties can be provided:

  • stroke: the color, provided as a hex string or English color name.
  • strokeWidth: if provided, draws a border around the chart area of the given width (and with the color of stroke).

Type: string or object

Default: ‘white’

chartArea.left

How far to draw the chart from the left border.

Type: number or string

Default: auto

chartArea.top

How far to draw the chart from the top border.

Type: number or string

Default: auto

chartArea.width

Chart area width.

Type: number or string

Default: auto

chartArea.height

Chart area height.

Type: number or string

Default: auto

colors

The colors to use for the chart elements. An array of strings, where each element is an HTML color string, for example: colors:['red','#004411'].

Type: Array of strings

Default: default colors

crosshair

An object containing the crosshair properties for the chart.

Type: object

Default: null

crosshair.color

The crosshair color, expressed as either a color name (e.g., “blue”) or an RGB value (e.g., “#adf”).

Type: string

Type: default

crosshair.focused

An object containing the crosshair properties upon focus.
Example: crosshair: { focused: { color: '#3bc', opacity: 0.8 } }

Type: object

Default: default

crosshair.opacity

The crosshair opacity, with 0.0 being fully transparent and 1.0 fully opaque.

Type: number

Default: 1.0

crosshair.orientation

The crosshair orientation, which can be ‘vertical’ for vertical hairs only, ‘horizontal’ for horizontal hairs only, or ‘both’ for traditional crosshairs.

Type: string

Default: ‘both’

crosshair.selected

An object containing the crosshair properties upon selection.
Example: crosshair: { selected: { color: '#3bc', opacity: 0.8 } }

Type: object

Default: default

crosshair.trigger

When to display crosshairs: on 'focus', 'selection', or 'both'.

Type: string

Default: ‘both’

curveType

Controls the curve of the lines when the line width is not zero. Can be one of the following:

  • ‘none’ – Straight lines without curve.
  • ‘function’ – The angles of the line will be smoothed.

Type:string

Default: ‘none’

dataOpacity

The transparency of data points, with 1.0 being completely opaque and 0.0 fully transparent. In scatter, histogram, bar, and column charts, this refers to the visible data: dots in the scatter chart and rectangles in the others. In charts where selecting data creates a dot, such as the line and area charts, this refers to the circles that appear upon hover or selection. The combo chart exhibits both behaviors, and this option has no effect on other charts. (To change the opacity of a trendline, see trendline opacity .)

Type: number

Default: 1.0

enableInteractivity

Whether the chart throws user-based events or reacts to user interaction. If false, the chart will not throw ‘select’ or other interaction-based events (but will throw ready or error events), and will not display hovertext or otherwise change depending on user input.

Type: boolean

Default: true

explorer

The explorer option allows users to pan and zoom Google charts. explorer: {} provides the default explorer behavior, enabling users to pan horizontally and vertically by dragging, and to zoom in and out by scrolling.

This feature is experimental and may change in future releases.

Note: The explorer only works with continuous axes (such as numbers or dates).

Type: object

Default: null

explorer.actions

The Google Charts explorer supports three actions:

  • dragToPan: Drag to pan around the chart horizontally and vertically. To pan only along the horizontal axis, use explorer: { axis: 'horizontal' }. Similarly for the vertical axis.
  • dragToZoom: The explorer’s default behavior is to zoom in and out when the user scrolls. If explorer: { actions: ['dragToZoom', 'rightClickToReset'] } is used, dragging across a rectangular area zooms into that area. We recommend using rightClickToReset whenever dragToZoom is used. See explorer.maxZoomIn, explorer.maxZoomOut, and explorer.zoomDelta for zoom customizations.
  • rightClickToReset: Right clicking on the chart returns it to the original pan and zoom level.

Type: Array of strings

Default: [‘dragToPan’, ‘rightClickToReset’]

explorer.axis

By default, users can pan both horizontally and vertically when the explorer option is used. If you want to users to only pan horizontally, use explorer: { axis: 'horizontal' }. Similarly, explorer: { axis: 'vertical' } enables vertical-only panning.

Type: string

Default: both horizontal and vertical panning

explorer.keepInBounds

By default, users can pan all around, regardless of where the data is. To ensure that users don’t pan beyond the original chart, use explorer: { keepInBounds: true }.

Type: boolean

Default: false

explorer.maxZoomIn

The maximum that the explorer can zoom in. By default, users will be able to zoom in enough that they’ll see only 25% of the original view. Setting explorer: { maxZoomIn: .5 } would let users zoom in only far enough to see half of the original view.

Type: number

Default: 0.25

explorer.maxZoomOut

The maximum that the explorer can zoom out. By default, users will be able to zoom out far enough that the chart will take up only 1/4 of the available space. Setting explorer: { maxZoomOut: 8 } would let users zoom out far enough that the chart would take up only 1/8 of the available space.

Type: number

Default: 4

explorer.zoomDelta

When users zoom in or out, explorer.zoomDelta determines how much they zoom by. The smaller the number, the smoother and slower the zoom.

Type: number

Default: 1.5

focusTarget

The type of the entity that receives focus on mouse hover. Also affects which entity is selected by mouse click, and which data table element is associated with events. Can be one of the following:

  • ‘datum’ – Focus on a single data point. Correlates to a cell in the data table.
  • ‘category’ – Focus on a grouping of all data points along the major axis. Correlates to a row in the data table.

In focusTarget ‘category’ the tooltip displays all the category values. This may be useful for comparing values of different series.

Type: string

Default: ‘datum’

fontSize

The default font size, in pixels, of all text in the chart. You can override this using properties for specific chart elements.

Type: number

Default: automatic

fontName

The default font face for all text in the chart. You can override this using properties for specific chart elements.

Type: string

Default: ‘Arial’

forceIFrame

Draws the chart inside an inline frame. (Note that on IE8, this option is ignored; all IE8 charts are drawn in i-frames.)

Type: boolean

Default: false

hAxis

An object with members to configure various horizontal axis elements. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:

{ title: 'Hello', titleTextStyle: { color: '#FF0000' }} 

Type: object

Default: null

hAxis.baseline

The baseline for the horizontal axis.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: number

Default: automatic

hAxis.baselineColor

The color of the baseline for the horizontal axis. Can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: number

Default: ‘black’

hAxis.direction

The direction in which the values along the horizontal axis grow. Specify -1 to reverse the order of the values.

Type: 1 or -1

Default: 1

hAxis.format

A format string for numeric or date axis labels.

For number axis labels, this is a subset of the decimal formatting ICU pattern set . For instance, {format:'#,###%'} will display values “1,000%”, “750%”, and “50%” for values 10, 7.5, and 0.5. You can also supply any of the following:

  • {format: 'none'}: displays numbers with no formatting (e.g., 8000000)
  • {format: 'decimal'}: displays numbers with thousands separators (e.g., 8,000,000)
  • {format: 'scientific'}: displays numbers in scientific notation (e.g., 8e6)
  • {format: 'currency'}: displays numbers in the local currency (e.g., $8,000,000.00)
  • {format: 'percent'}: displays numbers as percentages (e.g., 800,000,000%)
  • {format: 'short'}: displays abbreviated numbers (e.g., 8M)
  • {format: 'long'}: displays numbers as full words (e.g., 8 million)

For date axis labels, this is a subset of the date formatting ICU pattern set . For instance, {format:'MMM d, y'} will display the value “Jul 1, 2011” for the date of July first in 2011.

The actual formatting applied to the label is derived from the locale the API has been loaded with. For more details, see loading charts with a specific locale .

In computing tick values and gridlines, several alternative combinations of all the relevant gridline options will be considered and alternatives will be rejected if the formatted tick labels would be duplicated or overlap. So you can specify format:"#" if you want to only show integer tick values, but be aware that if no alternative satisfies this condition, no gridlines or ticks will be shown.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: string

Default: auto

hAxis.gridlines

An object with properties to configure the gridlines on the horizontal axis. Note that horizontal axis gridlines are drawn vertically. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:

{color: '#333', minSpacing: 20}

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: object

Default: null

hAxis.gridlines.color

The color of the horizontal gridlines inside the chart area. Specify a valid HTML color string.

Type: string

Default: ‘#CCC’

hAxis.gridlines.count

The approximate number of horizontal gridlines inside the chart area. If you specify a positive number for gridlines.count, it will be used to compute the minSpacing between gridlines. You can specify a value of 1 to only draw one gridline, or 0 to draw no gridlines. Specify -1, which is the default, to automatically compute the number of gridlines based on other options.

Type: number

Default: -1

hAxis.gridlines.interval

An array of sizes (as data values, not pixels) between adjacent gridlines. This option is only for numeric axes at this time, but it is analogous to the gridlines.units.<unit>.interval options which are used only for dates and times. For linear scales, the default is [1, 2, 2.5, 5] which means the gridline values can fall on every unit (1), on even units (2), or on multiples of 2.5 or 5. Any power of 10 times these values is also considered (e.g. [10, 20, 25, 50] and [.1, .2, .25, .5]). For log scales, the default is [1, 2, 5].

Type: number between 1 and 10, not including 10.

Default: computed

hAxis.gridlines.minSpacing

The minimum screen space, in pixels, between hAxis major gridlines. The default for major gridlines is 40 for linear scales, and 20 for log scales. If you specify the count and not the minSpacing, the minSpacing is computed from the count. And conversely, if you specify the minSpacing and not the count, the count is computed from the minSpacing. If you specify both, the minSpacing overrides.

Type: number

Default: computed

hAxis.gridlines.multiple

All gridline and tick values must be a multiple of this option’s value. Note that, unlike for intervals, powers of 10 times the multiple are not considered. So you can force ticks to be integers by specifying gridlines.multiple = 1, or force ticks to be multiples of 1000 by specifying gridlines.multiple = 1000.

Type: number

Default: 1

hAxis.gridlines.units

Overrides the default format for various aspects of date/datetime/timeofday data types when used with chart computed gridlines. Allows formatting for years, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds.

General format is:

gridlines: { units: { years: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, months: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, days: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} hours: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} minutes: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} seconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, milliseconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, }} 

Additional information can be found in Dates and Times.

Type: object

Default: null

hAxis.minorGridlines

An object with members to configure the minor gridlines on the horizontal axis, similar to the hAxis.gridlines option.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: object

Default: null

hAxis.minorGridlines.color

The color of the horizontal minor gridlines inside the chart area. Specify a valid HTML color string.

Type: string

Default: A blend of the gridline and background colors

hAxis.minorGridlines.count

The minorGridlines.count option is mostly deprecated, except for disabling minor gridlines by setting the count to 0. The number of minor gridlines now depends entirely on the interval between major gridlines (see hAxis.gridlines.interval) and the minimum required space (see hAxis.minorGridlines.minSpacing).

Type: number

Default:1

hAxis.minorGridlines.interval

The minorGridlines.interval option is like the major gridlines interval option, but the interval that is chosen will always be an even divisor of the major gridline interval. The default interval for linear scales is [1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 5], and for log scales is [1, 2, 5].

Type: number

Default:1

hAxis.minorGridlines.minSpacing

The minimum required space, in pixels, between adjacent minor gridlines, and between minor and major gridlines. The default value is 1/2 the minSpacing of major gridlines for linear scales, and 1/5 the minSpacing for log scales.

Type: number

Default:computed

hAxis.minorGridlines.multiple

Same as for major gridlines.multiple.

Type: number

Default: 1

hAxis.minorGridlines.units

Overrides the default format for various aspects of date/datetime/timeofday data types when used with chart computed minorGridlines. Allows formatting for years, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds.

General format is:

gridlines: { units: { years: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, months: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, days: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} hours: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} minutes: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} seconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, milliseconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, }} 

Additional information can be found in Dates and Times.

Type: object

Default: null

hAxis.logScale

hAxis property that makes the horizontal axis a logarithmic scale (requires all values to be positive). Set to true for yes.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: boolean

Default: false

hAxis.scaleType

hAxis property that makes the horizontal axis a logarithmic scale. Can be one of the following:

  • null – No logarithmic scaling is performed.
  • ‘log’ – Logarithmic scaling. Negative and zero values are not plotted. This option is the same as setting hAxis: { logscale: true }.
  • ‘mirrorLog’ – Logarithmic scaling in which negative and zero values are plotted. The plotted value of a negative number is the negative of the log of the absolute value. Values close to 0 are plotted on a linear scale.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: string

Default: null

hAxis.textPosition

Position of the horizontal axis text, relative to the chart area. Supported values: ‘out’, ‘in’, ‘none’.

Type: string

Default: ‘out’

hAxis.textStyle

An object that specifies the horizontal axis text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

hAxis.ticks

Replaces the automatically generated X-axis ticks with the specified array. Each element of the array should be either a valid tick value (such as a number, date, datetime, or timeofday), or an object. If it’s an object, it should have a v property for the tick value, and an optional f property containing the literal string to be displayed as the label.

The viewWindow will be automatically expanded to include the min and max ticks unless you specify a viewWindow.min or viewWindow.max to override.

Examples:

  • hAxis: { ticks: [5,10,15,20] }
  • hAxis: { ticks: [{v:32, f:'thirty two'}, {v:64, f:'sixty four'}] }
  • hAxis: { ticks: [new Date(2014,3,15), new Date(2013,5,15)] }
  • hAxis: { ticks: [16, {v:32, f:'thirty two'}, {v:64, f:'sixty four'}, 128] }

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: Array of elements

Default: auto

hAxis.title

hAxis property that specifies the title of the horizontal axis.

Type: string

Default: null

hAxis.titleTextStyle

An object that specifies the horizontal axis title text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

hAxis.allowContainerBoundaryTextCutoff

If false, will hide outermost labels rather than allow them to be cropped by the chart container. If true, will allow label cropping.

This option is only supported for a discrete axis.

Type: boolean

Default: false

hAxis.slantedText

If true, draw the horizontal axis text at an angle, to help fit more text along the axis; if false, draw horizontal axis text upright. Default behavior is to slant text if it cannot all fit when drawn upright. Notice that this option is available only when the hAxis.textPosition is set to ‘out’ (which is the default). The default is false for dates and times.

Type: boolean

Default: automatic

hAxis.slantedTextAngle

The angle of the horizontal axis text, if it’s drawn slanted. Ignored if hAxis.slantedText is false, or is in auto mode, and the chart decided to draw the text horizontally. If the angle is positive, the rotation is counter-clockwise, and if negative, it is clockwise.

Type: number, -90—90

Default: 30

hAxis.maxAlternation

Maximum number of levels of horizontal axis text. If axis text labels become too crowded, the server might shift neighboring labels up or down in order to fit labels closer together. This value specifies the most number of levels to use; the server can use fewer levels, if labels can fit without overlapping. For dates and times, the default is 1.

Type: number

Default: 2

hAxis.maxTextLines

Maximum number of lines allowed for the text labels. Labels can span multiple lines if they are too long, and the number of lines is, by default, limited by the height of the available space.

Type: number

Default: auto

hAxis.minTextSpacing

Minimum horizontal spacing, in pixels, allowed between two adjacent text labels. If the labels are spaced too densely, or they are too long, the spacing can drop below this threshold, and in this case one of the label-unclutter measures will be applied (e.g, truncating the labels or dropping some of them).

Type: number

Default: The value of hAxis.textStyle.fontSize

hAxis.showTextEvery

How many horizontal axis labels to show, where 1 means show every label, 2 means show every other label, and so on. Default is to try to show as many labels as possible without overlapping.

Type: number

Default: automatic

hAxis.maxValue

Moves the max value of the horizontal axis to the specified value; this will be rightward in most charts. Ignored if this is set to a value smaller than the maximum x-value of the data. hAxis.viewWindow.max overrides this property.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: number

Default: automatic

hAxis.minValue

Moves the min value of the horizontal axis to the specified value; this will be leftward in most charts. Ignored if this is set to a value greater than the minimum x-value of the data. hAxis.viewWindow.min overrides this property.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: number

Default: automatic

hAxis.viewWindowMode

Specifies how to scale the horizontal axis to render the values within the chart area. The following string values are supported:

  • ‘pretty’ – Scale the horizontal values so that the maximum and minimum data values are rendered a bit inside the left and right of the chart area. The viewWindow is expanded to the nearest major gridline for numbers, or the nearest minor gridline for dates and times.
  • ‘maximized’ – Scale the horizontal values so that the maximum and minimum data values touch the left and right of the chart area. This will cause haxis.viewWindow.min and haxis.viewWindow.max to be ignored.
  • ‘explicit’ – A deprecated option for specifying the left and right scale values of the chart area. (Deprecated because it’s redundant with haxis.viewWindow.min and haxis.viewWindow.max.) Data values outside these values will be cropped. You must specify an hAxis.viewWindow object describing the maximum and minimum values to show.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: string

Default: Equivalent to ‘pretty’, but haxis.viewWindow.min and haxis.viewWindow.max take precedence if used.

hAxis.viewWindow

Specifies the cropping range of the horizontal axis.

Type: object

Default: null

hAxis.viewWindow.max

  • For a continuous axis:

    The maximum horizontal data value to render.

  • For a discrete axis:

    The zero-based row index where the cropping window ends. Data points at this index and higher will be cropped out. In conjunction with vAxis.viewWindowMode.min, it defines a half-opened range [min, max) that denotes the element indices to display. In other words, every index such that min <= index < max will be displayed.

Ignored when hAxis.viewWindowMode is ‘pretty’ or ‘maximized’.

Type: number

Default: auto

hAxis.viewWindow.min

  • For a continuous axis:

    The minimum horizontal data value to render.

  • For a discrete axis:

    The zero-based row index where the cropping window begins. Data points at indices lower than this will be cropped out. In conjunction with vAxis.viewWindowMode.max, it defines a half-opened range [min, max) that denotes the element indices to display. In other words, every index such that min <= index < max will be displayed.

Ignored when hAxis.viewWindowMode is ‘pretty’ or ‘maximized’.

Type: number

Default: auto

height

Height of the chart, in pixels.

Type: number

Default: height of the containing element

interpolateNulls

Whether to guess the value of missing points. If true, it will guess the value of any missing data based on neighboring points. If false, it will leave a break in the line at the unknown point.

This is not supported by Area charts with the isStacked: true/'percent'/'relative'/'absolute' option.

Type: boolean

Default: false

legend

An object with members to configure various aspects of the legend. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:

{position: 'top', textStyle: {color: 'blue', fontSize: 16}}

Type: object

Default: null

legend.alignment

Alignment of the legend. Can be one of the following:

  • ‘start’ – Aligned to the start of the area allocated for the legend.
  • ‘center’ – Centered in the area allocated for the legend.
  • ‘end’ – Aligned to the end of the area allocated for the legend.

Start, center, and end are relative to the style — vertical or horizontal — of the legend. For example, in a ‘right’ legend, ‘start’ and ‘end’ are at the top and bottom, respectively; for a ‘top’ legend, ‘start’ and ‘end’ would be at the left and right of the area, respectively.

The default value depends on the legend’s position. For ‘bottom’ legends, the default is ‘center’; other legends default to ‘start’.

Type: string

Default: automatic

legend.maxLines

Maximum number of lines in the legend. Set this to a number greater than one to add lines to your legend. Note: The exact logic used to determine the actual number of lines rendered is still in flux.

This option currently works only when legend.position is ‘top’.

Type: number

Default: 1

legend.pageIndex

Initial selected zero-based page index of the legend.

Type: number

Default: 0

legend.position

Position of the legend. Can be one of the following:

  • ‘bottom’ – Below the chart.
  • ‘left’ – To the left of the chart, provided the left axis has no series associated with it. So if you want the legend on the left, use the option targetAxisIndex: 1.
  • ‘in’ – Inside the chart, by the top left corner.
  • ‘none’ – No legend is displayed.
  • ‘right’ – To the right of the chart. Incompatible with the vAxes option.
  • ‘top’ – Above the chart.

Type: string

Default: ‘right’

legend.textStyle

An object that specifies the legend text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

lineDashStyle

The on-and-off pattern for dashed lines. For instance, [4, 4] will repeat 4-length dashes followed by 4-length gaps, and [5, 1, 3] will repeat a 5-length dash, a 1-length gap, a 3-length dash, a 5-length gap, a 1-length dash, and a 3-length gap. See Dashed Lines for more information.

Type: Array of numbers

Default: null

lineWidth

Data line width in pixels. Use zero to hide all lines and show only the points. You can override values for individual series using the series property.

Type: number

Default: 2

orientation

The orientation of the chart. When set to 'vertical', rotates the axes of the chart so that (for instance) a column chart becomes a bar chart, and an area chart grows rightward instead of up:


Type: string

Default: ‘horizontal’

pointShape

The shape of individual data elements: ‘circle’, ‘triangle’, ‘square’, ‘diamond’, ‘star’, or ‘polygon’. See the points documentation for examples.

Type: string

Default: ‘circle’

pointSize

Diameter of displayed points in pixels. Use zero to hide all points. You can override values for individual series using the series property. If you’re using a trendline, the pointSize option will affect the width of the trendline unless you override it with the trendlines.n.pointsize option.

Type: number

Default: 0

pointsVisible

Determines whether points will be displayed. Set to false to hide all points. You can override values for individual series using the series property. If you’re using a trendline, the pointsVisible option will affect the visibility of the points on all trendlines unless you override it with the trendlines.n.pointsVisible option.

This can also be overridden using the style role in the form of "point {visible: true}".

Type: boolean

Default: true

reverseCategories

If set to true, will draw series from right to left. The default is to draw left-to-right.

This option is only supported for a discrete major axis.

Type: boolean

Default: false

selectionMode

When selectionMode is 'multiple', users may select multiple data points.

Type: string

Default: ‘single’

series

An array of objects, each describing the format of the corresponding series in the chart. To use default values for a series, specify an empty object {}. If a series or a value is not specified, the global value will be used. Each object supports the following properties:

  • annotations – An object to be applied to annotations for this series. This can be used to control, for instance, the textStyle for the series:

    series: { 0: { annotations: { textStyle: {fontSize: 12, color: 'red' } } }} 

    See the various annotations options for a more complete list of what can be customized.

  • color – The color to use for this series. Specify a valid HTML color string.
  • curveType – Overrides the global curveType value for this series.
  • labelInLegend – The description of the series to appear in the chart legend.
  • lineDashStyle – Overrides the global lineDashStyle value for this series.
  • lineWidth – Overrides the global lineWidth value for this series.
  • pointShape – Overrides the global pointShape value for this series.
  • pointSize – Overrides the global pointSize value for this series.
  • pointsVisible – Overrides the global pointsVisible value for this series.
  • targetAxisIndex – Which axis to assign this series to, where 0 is the default axis, and 1 is the opposite axis. Default value is 0; set to 1 to define a chart where different series are rendered against different axes. At least one series much be allocated to the default axis. You can define a different scale for different axes.
  • visibleInLegend – A boolean value, where true means that the series should have a legend entry, and false means that it should not. Default is true.

You can specify either an array of objects, each of which applies to the series in the order given, or you can specify an object where each child has a numeric key indicating which series it applies to. For example, the following two declarations are identical, and declare the first series as black and absent from the legend, and the fourth as red and absent from the legend:

series: [ {color: 'black', visibleInLegend: false}, {}, {}, {color: 'red', visibleInLegend: false}]series: { 0:{color: 'black', visibleInLegend: false}, 3:{color: 'red', visibleInLegend: false}} 

Type: Array of objects, or object with nested objects

Default: {}

theme

A theme is a set of predefined option values that work together to achieve a specific chart behavior or visual effect. Currently only one theme is available:

  • ‘maximized’ – Maximizes the area of the chart, and draws the legend and all of the labels inside the chart area. Sets the following options:
    chartArea: {width: '100%', height: '100%'},legend: {position: 'in'},titlePosition: 'in', axisTitlesPosition: 'in',hAxis: {textPosition: 'in'}, vAxis: {textPosition: 'in'} 

Type: string

Default: null

title

Text to display above the chart.

Type: string

Default: no title

titlePosition

Where to place the chart title, compared to the chart area. Supported values:

  • in – Draw the title inside the chart area.
  • out – Draw the title outside the chart area.
  • none – Omit the title.

Type: string

Default: ‘out’

titleTextStyle

An object that specifies the title text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

tooltip

An object with members to configure various tooltip elements. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:

{textStyle: {color: '#FF0000'}, showColorCode: true}

Type: object

Default: null

tooltip.ignoreBounds

If set to true, allows the drawing of tooltips to flow outside of the bounds of the chart on all sides.

Note: This only applies to HTML tooltips. If this is enabled with SVG tooltips, any overflow outside of the chart bounds will be cropped. See Customizing Tooltip Content for more details.

Type: boolean

Default: false

tooltip.isHtml

If set to true, use HTML-rendered (rather than SVG-rendered) tooltips. See Customizing Tooltip Content for more details.

Note: customization of the HTML tooltip content via the tooltip column data role is not supported by the Bubble Chart visualization.

Type: boolean

Default: false

tooltip.showColorCode

If true, show colored squares next to the series information in the tooltip. The default is true when focusTarget is set to ‘category’, otherwise the default is false.

Type: boolean

Default: automatic

tooltip.textStyle

An object that specifies the tooltip text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

tooltip.trigger

The user interaction that causes the tooltip to be displayed:

  • ‘focus’ – The tooltip will be displayed when the user hovers over the element.
  • ‘none’ – The tooltip will not be displayed.
  • ‘selection’ – The tooltip will be displayed when the user selects the element.

Type: string

Default: ‘focus’

trendlines

Displays trendlines on the charts that support them. By default, linear trendlines are used, but this can be customized with the trendlines.n.type option.

Trendlines are specified on a per-series basis, so most of the time your options will look like this:

var options = { trendlines: { 0: { type: 'linear', color: 'green', lineWidth: 3, opacity: 0.3, showR2: true, visibleInLegend: true } }} 

Type: object

Default: null

trendlines.n.color

The color of the trendline , expressed as either an English color name or a hex string.

Type: string

Default: default series color

trendlines.n.degree

For trendlines of type: 'polynomial', the degree of the polynomial (2 for quadratic, 3 for cubic, and so on). (The default degree may change from 3 to 2 in an upcoming release of Google Charts.)

Type: number

Default: 3

trendlines.n.labelInLegend

If set, the trendline will appear in the legend as this string.

Type: string

Default: null

trendlines.n.lineWidth

The line width of the trendline , in pixels.

Type: number

Default: 2

trendlines.n.opacity

The transparency of the trendline , from 0.0 (transparent) to 1.0 (opaque).

Type: number

Default: 1.0

trendlines.n.pointSize

Trendlines are constucted by stamping a bunch of dots on the chart; this rarely-needed option lets you customize the size of the dots. The trendline’s lineWidth option will usually be preferable. However, you’ll need this option if you’re using the global pointSize option and want a different point size for your trendlines.

Type: number

Default: 1

trendlines.n.pointsVisible

Trendlines are constucted by stamping a bunch of dots on the chart. The trendline’s pointsVisible option determines whether the points for a particular trendline are visible.

Type: boolean

Default: true

trendlines.n.showR2

Whether to show the coefficient of determination in the legend or trendline tooltip.

Type: boolean

Default: false

trendlines.n.type

Whether the trendlines is 'linear' (the default), 'exponential', or 'polynomial'.

Type: string

Default: linear

trendlines.n.visibleInLegend

Whether the trendline equation appears in the legend. (It will appear in the trendline tooltip.)

Type: boolean

Default: false

vAxes

Specifies properties for individual vertical axes, if the chart has multiple vertical axes. Each child object is a vAxis object, and can contain all the properties supported by vAxis. These property values override any global settings for the same property.

To specify a chart with multiple vertical axes, first define a new axis using series.targetAxisIndex, then configure the axis using vAxes. The following example assigns series 2 to the right axis and specifies a custom title and text style for it:

{ series: { 2: { targetAxisIndex:1 } }, vAxes: { 1: { title:'Losses', textStyle: {color: 'red'} } }} 

This property can be either an object or an array: the object is a collection of objects, each with a numeric label that specifies the axis that it defines–this is the format shown above; the array is an array of objects, one per axis. For example, the following array-style notation is identical to the vAxis object shown above:

vAxes: [ {}, // Nothing specified for axis 0 { title:'Losses', textStyle: {color: 'red'} // Axis 1 }] 

Type: Array of object, or object with child objects

Default: null

vAxis

An object with members to configure various vertical axis elements. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:

{title: 'Hello', titleTextStyle: {color: '#FF0000'}}

Type: object

Default: null

vAxis.baseline

vAxis property that specifies the baseline for the vertical axis. If the baseline is larger than the highest grid line or smaller than the lowest grid line, it will be rounded to the closest gridline.

Type: number

Default: automatic

vAxis.baselineColor

Specifies the color of the baseline for the vertical axis. Can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'.

Type: number

Default: ‘black’

vAxis.direction

The direction in which the values along the vertical axis grow. By default, low values are on the bottom of the chart. Specify -1 to reverse the order of the values.

Type: 1 or -1

Default: 1

vAxis.format

A format string for numeric axis labels. This is a subset of the ICU pattern set . For instance, {format:'#,###%'} will display values “1,000%”, “750%”, and “50%” for values 10, 7.5, and 0.5. You can also supply any of the following:

  • {format: 'none'}: displays numbers with no formatting (e.g., 8000000)
  • {format: 'decimal'}: displays numbers with thousands separators (e.g., 8,000,000)
  • {format: 'scientific'}: displays numbers in scientific notation (e.g., 8e6)
  • {format: 'currency'}: displays numbers in the local currency (e.g., $8,000,000.00)
  • {format: 'percent'}: displays numbers as percentages (e.g., 800,000,000%)
  • {format: 'short'}: displays abbreviated numbers (e.g., 8M)
  • {format: 'long'}: displays numbers as full words (e.g., 8 million)

The actual formatting applied to the label is derived from the locale the API has been loaded with. For more details, see loading charts with a specific locale .

In computing tick values and gridlines, several alternative combinations of all the relevant gridline options will be considered and alternatives will be rejected if the formatted tick labels would be duplicated or overlap. So you can specify format:"#" if you want to only show integer tick values, but be aware that if no alternative satisfies this condition, no gridlines or ticks will be shown.

Type: string

Default: auto

vAxis.gridlines

An object with members to configure the gridlines on the vertical axis. Note that vertical axis gridlines are drawn horizontally. To specify properties of this object, you can use object literal notation, as shown here:

{color: '#333', minSpacing: 20}

Type: object

Default: null

vAxis.gridlines.color

The color of the vertical gridlines inside the chart area. Specify a valid HTML color string.

Type: string

Default: ‘#CCC’

vAxis.gridlines.count

The approximate number of horizontal gridlines inside the chart area. If you specify a positive number for gridlines.count, it will be used to compute the minSpacing between gridlines. You can specify a value of 1 to only draw one gridline, or 0 to draw no gridlines. Specify -1, which is the default, to automatically compute the number of gridlines based on other options.

Type: number

Default: -1

vAxis.gridlines.interval

An array of sizes (as data values, not pixels) between adjacent gridlines. This option is only for numeric axes at this time, but it is analogous to the gridlines.units.<unit>.interval options which are used only for dates and times. For linear scales, the default is [1, 2, 2.5, 5] which means the gridline values can fall on every unit (1), on even units (2), or on multiples of 2.5 or 5. Any power of 10 times these values is also considered (e.g. [10, 20, 25, 50] and [.1, .2, .25, .5]). For log scales, the default is [1, 2, 5].

Type: number between 1 and 10, not including 10.

Default: computed

vAxis.gridlines.minSpacing

The minimum screen space, in pixels, between hAxis major gridlines. The default for major gridlines is 40 for linear scales, and 20 for log scales. If you specify the count and not the minSpacing, the minSpacing is computed from the count. And conversely, if you specify the minSpacing and not the count, the count is computed from the minSpacing. If you specify both, the minSpacing overrides.

Type: number

Default: computed

vAxis.gridlines.multiple

All gridline and tick values must be a multiple of this option’s value. Note that, unlike for intervals, powers of 10 times the multiple are not considered. So you can force ticks to be integers by specifying gridlines.multiple = 1, or force ticks to be multiples of 1000 by specifying gridlines.multiple = 1000.

Type: number

Default: 1

vAxis.gridlines.units

Overrides the default format for various aspects of date/datetime/timeofday data types when used with chart computed gridlines. Allows formatting for years, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds.

General format is:

gridlines: { units: { years: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, months: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, days: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, hours: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, minutes: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, seconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, milliseconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} }} 

Additional information can be found in Dates and Times.

Type: object

Default: null

vAxis.minorGridlines

An object with members to configure the minor gridlines on the vertical axis, similar to the vAxis.gridlines option.

Type: object

Default: null

vAxis.minorGridlines.color

The color of the vertical minor gridlines inside the chart area. Specify a valid HTML color string.

Type: string

Default: A blend of the gridline and background colors

vAxis.minorGridlines.count

The minorGridlines.count option is mostly deprecated, except for disabling minor gridlines by setting the count to 0. The number of minor gridlines depends on the interval between major gridlines (see vAxis.gridlines.interval) and the minimum required space (see vAxis.minorGridlines.minSpacing).

Type: number

Default: 1

vAxis.minorGridlines.interval

The minorGridlines.interval option is like the major gridlines interval option, but the interval that is chosen will always be an even divisor of the major gridline interval. The default interval for linear scales is [1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 5], and for log scales is [1, 2, 5].

Type: number

Default:1

vAxis.minorGridlines.minSpacing

The minimum required space, in pixels, between adjacent minor gridlines, and between minor and major gridlines. The default value is 1/2 the minSpacing of major gridlines for linear scales, and 1/5 the minSpacing for log scales.

Type: number

Default:computed

vAxis.minorGridlines.multiple

Same as for major gridlines.multiple.

Type: number

Default: 1

vAxis.minorGridlines.units

Overrides the default format for various aspects of date/datetime/timeofday data types when used with chart computed minorGridlines. Allows formatting for years, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds.

General format is:

gridlines: { units: { years: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, months: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, days: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} hours: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} minutes: {format: [/*format strings here*/]} seconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, milliseconds: {format: [/*format strings here*/]}, }} 

Additional information can be found in Dates and Times.

Type: object

Default: null

vAxis.logScale

If true, makes the vertical axis a logarithmic scale. Note: All values must be positive.

Type: boolean

Default: false

vAxis.scaleType

vAxis property that makes the vertical axis a logarithmic scale. Can be one of the following:

  • null – No logarithmic scaling is performed.
  • ‘log’ – Logarithmic scaling. Negative and zero values are not plotted. This option is the same as setting vAxis: { logscale: true }.
  • ‘mirrorLog’ – Logarithmic scaling in which negative and zero values are plotted. The plotted value of a negative number is the negative of the log of the absolute value. Values close to 0 are plotted on a linear scale.

This option is only supported for a continuous axis.

Type: string

Default: null

vAxis.textPosition

Position of the vertical axis text, relative to the chart area. Supported values: ‘out’, ‘in’, ‘none’.

Type: string

Default: ‘out’

vAxis.textStyle

An object that specifies the vertical axis text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

vAxis.ticks

Replaces the automatically generated Y-axis ticks with the specified array. Each element of the array should be either a valid tick value (such as a number, date, datetime, or timeofday), or an object. If it’s an object, it should have a v property for the tick value, and an optional f property containing the literal string to be displayed as the label.

The viewWindow will be automatically expanded to include the min and max ticks unless you specify a viewWindow.min or viewWindow.max to override.

Examples:

  • vAxis: { ticks: [5,10,15,20] }
  • vAxis: { ticks: [{v:32, f:'thirty two'}, {v:64, f:'sixty four'}] }
  • vAxis: { ticks: [new Date(2014,3,15), new Date(2013,5,15)] }
  • vAxis: { ticks: [16, {v:32, f:'thirty two'}, {v:64, f:'sixty four'}, 128] }

Type: Array of elements

Default: auto

vAxis.title

vAxis property that specifies a title for the vertical axis.

Type: string

Default: no title

vAxis.titleTextStyle

An object that specifies the vertical axis title text style. The object has this format:

{ color: <string>, fontName: <string>, fontSize: <number>, bold: <boolean>, italic: <boolean> } 

The color can be any HTML color string, for example: 'red' or '#00cc00'. Also see fontName and fontSize.

Type: object

Default: {color: 'black', fontName: <global-font-name>, fontSize: <global-font-size>}

vAxis.maxValue

Moves the max value of the vertical axis to the specified value; this will be upward in most charts. Ignored if this is set to a value smaller than the maximum y-value of the data. vAxis.viewWindow.max overrides this property.

Type: number

Default: automatic

vAxis.minValue

Moves the min value of the vertical axis to the specified value; this will be downward in most charts. Ignored if this is set to a value greater than the minimum y-value of the data. vAxis.viewWindow.min overrides this property.

Type: number

Default: null

vAxis.viewWindowMode

Specifies how to scale the vertical axis to render the values within the chart area. The following string values are supported:

  • ‘pretty’ – Scale the vertical values so that the maximum and minimum data values are rendered a bit inside the bottom and top of the chart area. The viewWindow is expanded to the nearest major gridline for numbers, or the nearest minor gridline for dates and times.
  • ‘maximized’ – Scale the vertical values so that the maximum and minimum data values touch the top and bottom of the chart area. This will cause vaxis.viewWindow.min and vaxis.viewWindow.max to be ignored.
  • ‘explicit’ – A deprecated option for specifying the top and bottom scale values of the chart area. (Deprecated because it’s redundant with vaxis.viewWindow.min and vaxis.viewWindow.max. Data values outside these values will be cropped. You must specify a vAxis.viewWindow object describing the maximum and minimum values to show.

Type: string

Default: Equivalent to ‘pretty’, but vaxis.viewWindow.min and vaxis.viewWindow.max take precedence if used.

vAxis.viewWindow

Specifies the cropping range of the vertical axis.

Type: object

Default: null

vAxis.viewWindow.max

The maximum vertical data value to render.

Ignored when vAxis.viewWindowMode is ‘pretty’ or ‘maximized’.

Type: number

Default: auto

vAxis.viewWindow.min

The minimum vertical data value to render.

Ignored when vAxis.viewWindowMode is ‘pretty’ or ‘maximized’.

Type: number

Default: auto

width

Width of the chart, in pixels.

Type: number

Default: width of the containing element

Written by Jane